The woman clothed with the sun
  Home  
Holy Scripture     ru     en  
       
 
 
Main
+ Categories
+ Apparitions
La Salette
Fatima
Beauraing
Heede
Garabandal
Zeitun
Akita
Melleray
Medjugorje
History
Apostasy
Communism
1000 years
Bible
Theotokos
Commentary
Prayer
Rosary
Theosis
Heart
Sacrifice
Church
Society
Nature
Personalities
Texts
Articles
Directory
References
Bibliography
email
 
Bulgakov. God. Creator Category: Theosis …between created and uncreated…

God. Creator
Creatio ex nihilo
In the works of Fr. Sergei Bulgakov

There is nothing apart from God

Divine being is limitless. Nothing is by no means like an ocean that flows around this being. God created the world out of Himself.

The whole power of the world's being belongs to Divinity. This power is divine: "in him we live, and move, and have our being" (Acts 17:28); "for of him, through him, and to him, are all things" (Rom 11:36).

Only the divinity of the existent God is, and there is nothing apart from and outside of divinity. This axiom of the religious consciousness is directly opposite to the nonreligious, immanent consciousness for which being belongs only to the world and, consequently, there is no God. One can choose only between these two possibilities: only divinity or only the world. Tertium non datur. This fallacious third possibility, according to which both divinity and the world primordially coexist on an equal footing, opposing each other or combining in different proportions, must be wholly excluded. But, in fact, it is precisely this kind of conception that, semiconsciously, most often has dominion over the minds of men. But this conception directly contradicts the doctrine that God created the world out of nothing, and that therefore there is nothing except divinity itself. "Out of nothing" means, after all, that there is no matter or force that could contain the possibility of the world and could assure for the world a place alongside God, outside of or apart from God. The existent God has being, that is, essence and existence. The trihypostatic Person of God has His own nature or His own divine world, and all belongs to this life and world. Therefore, the assertion that there is nothing apart from God is only a negative expression of this positive conception. In fact, such an extradivine nothing simply does not exist. It is by no means the limit to divine being. Divine being is limitless. Nothing is by no means like an ocean that flows around this being. Rather, it is divinity itself that is an ocean without any shores. A limit is only a postulate of our thought concerning relative, bounded existence, but not concerning the absolute, limitless being of God. Absolute nothing, ouk on, simply does not exist; it is a "conditioned reflex" of our thought, not more. And if we believe that the world is created out of nothing, then, in the positive sense, this can mean only that God created the world out of Himself (to use Metropolitan Antonii Khrapovitsky's bold expression). The whole power of the world's being belongs to Divinity. This power is divine: "in him we live, and move, and have our being" (Acts 17:28); "for of him, through him, and to him, are all things" (Rom 11:36).

The divine world exists in itself, in its nonhypostatic being, precisely as a determinate content of the divine cosmos, as the world.

Self-determination by which the hypostatic God, eternally possessing this divine world as His own nature, releases it from the depths of hypostatic being into self-being, makes it the cosmos in the true sense, creates the world "out of nothing," that is, out of Himself, out of His own divine content.

The trihypostatic God has the divine world in and for Himself. But the being of this divine world contains yet another mode of its being in itself: as content that is independent of its belonging to God. The divine world belongs not only to God's being, being hypostatized in it. The divine world also exists in itself, in its nonhypostatic being, precisely as a determinate content of the divine cosmos, as the world. And this dual character of the being of the divine world in God also lays the foundation for the two modes of the world's being in itself: as the divine world, which enters into hypostatic life, and as the world, which contains the entire fullness and richness of its own being. And to this corresponds that self-determination by which the hypostatic God, eternally possessing this divine world as His own nature, releases it from the depths of hypostatic being into self-being, makes it the cosmos in the true sense, creates the world "out of nothing," that is, out of Himself, out of His own divine content. In other words, creation is, first of all, an act of God's own self-determination, God's action in Himself. It is audacious and impious to ask whether God could have not created the world, for it is meaningless to introduce the caprice of chance where all is illuminated by the light of God's face and only divine reality exists.

God posits Himself as the Creator

The act of divine self-determination by which God gives His own nature, or the Divine Sophia, nonhypostatic, autonomous, and, in this sense, extra-divine being, thereby annulling, as it were, her inclusion in His hypostatic being, is a mystery of divine life.

The act of divine self-determination by which God gives His own nature, or the Divine Sophia, nonhypostatic, autonomous, and, in this sense, extra-divine being, thereby annulling, as it were, her inclusion in His hypostatic being, is a mystery of divine life. In its how, this mystery is unfathomable for both human beings and angels, for creatures in general. Only God's Spirit knows God's depths, which forever remain inaccessible for creatures. However, in its what, in the very fact of creation, in its power and even in its contours, this mystery becomes accessible to creatures, insofar as it is turned toward the life of creatures and even determines this life.

God posits Himself as the Creator. This means that He has His divine world in a twofold way: as Sophia and as creation, or (which is the same thing) as the Divine and the creaturely Sophia.

"Creation of the world out of nothing" is therefore a divine act, which is, first of all, a divine self-determination. God posits Himself as the Creator. This means that He has His divine world in a twofold way: as Sophia and as creation, or (which is the same thing) as the Divine and the creaturely Sophia. The Divine Sophia exists in eternity, in a unitary integral act, whereas the creaturely Sophia is submerged in temporality and becoming, in "nothing." God in the Holy Trinity creates the world: the Father, as the Beginning or Principle, posits the world by his sophianic self-revelation ("in the Beginning") in the Son and the Holy Spirit. The hypostatic creative act proceeds from the Father. The Son and the Holy Spirit are "hands" as it were: "All things were made by him (the Word)" by the Holy Spirit [See The Comforter, chaps.4, 5].

The multi-thematic character of being, which is contained in the divine world of the integrally wise multi-unity, is decomposed here into a multiplicity of becomings. Succession in time and connectedness in space are included here. A peculiar new life arises, a new self-creativity of the creaturely Sophia by the powers of the Divine Sophia.

Kenosis of love

God loves himself with divine love not only in His own life in the Divine Sophia but also in the creaturely Sophia.

God loves himself with divine love not only in His own life in the Divine Sophia but also in the life of the world, that is, in the life of the same Sophia but freed, as it were, from the hypostatized being in God, in her non-hypostatic being. This, once again, is what creation is: by virtue of it God, having His divinity as God in His Sophia, is also the Creator in His creation. The first definition is inseparably connected with the second. One should not diminish the second definition, the definition of God as the Creator, in comparison with the first, as some sort of accidental, secondary definition, which does not have a ground in itself. The second definition is just as supra-eternal and necessary as the first. God as Love in His eternity is both the Creator and God in His own life. The two are identical and cannot be separated.

The Holy Trinity in Unity, or the Unity in Trinity, renounces, as it were, in its sacrificially kenotic love the possession of the divine world for itself and allows this world to have its own being.

This trihypostatic kenosis of love is manifested in yet another way in the relation of God to the divine world in the act of creation. Here, the Holy Trinity in Unity, or the Unity in Trinity, renounces, as it were, in its sacrificially kenotic love the possession of the divine world for itself and allows this world to have its own being. The Trinity in Unity has, or posits, this world outside itself, in separateness from itself, precisely as the world, as nonhypostatic self-being. To be sure, ontologically, there can be no such separation of the world from God, "for in him we live, and move, and have our being" (Acts 17:28), and, from all eternity, the divine world belongs to God, existent in the Holy Trinity, as His self-revelation. But "in creating the world," in giving it self-being, God does not take away from it the divine force of its being. Rather, he posits the world outside Himself, as it were, releases it from Himself into divinely extra-divine and even non-divine being. This precisely means that God creates the world. This creation is, first of all, God's own self-determination in His own being.

See also

Links

Bibliography

       
     
        For this research to continue
please support us.
       
       
       
Contact information     © 2012—2022    1260.org     Disclaimer